Monday, July 11, 2022

Foods That Can Slow Down Your Metabolism

 


Weight Loss:  If you have done your research on weight loss, you must have come across the word 'metabolism'. It is a biochemical process that converts foods and drinks into energy, thus, preventing the accumulation of calories and fat in the body. Most of us are aware of ways to fire up our metabolism to achieve weight loss. But have you given it a thought that you might be doing something wrong that could be slowing down your metabolism? Our diet plays an important role in propelling our metabolic system and some wrong foods can do just the opposite!  

If you want to lose weight healthily, check if you are consuming the following foods more than often. These foods are said to slow down metabolism and it is time you cast them aside. 


>>> Strange “purple weed” FIRES OFF 3 lbs of fat every 4 days.


Here're Some Foods That Can Lower Metabolism Rate: 

Refined Grains 

All weight-loss diets recommend whole grains like wheat, oats and barley over refined grains and the reason is that refined grains are derived by breaking down whole grains and a large amount of fiber is lost. Fiber helps in the easy digestion of foods. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition proved this with a study that compared the metabolism rate of two groups of people - one that consumed refined grains and the other that was on a diet of refined grains. It was observed that all the volunteers who ate whole grains lost close to an extra 100 calories per day due to a combination of increased resting metabolic rate and greater fecal losses. So, avoid refined grains in the form of: 

  • White Rice 
  • White Bread 
  • Cakes 

 High-Fructose Foods and Drinks

  All soda-based beverages contain high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). The metabolism of fructose differs from that of glucose.  A study published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concludes that fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion, which leads to increased energy intake and weight gain. You must avoid: 

  • Soda 
  • Cold Drinks 
  • Packaged Juices 
  • Energy Drinks 
  • All fructose-enhanced foods like biscuits and candies 


>>> Strange “purple weed” FIRES OFF 3 lbs of fat every 4 days.

 

Fried Foods

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition states, "During frying, food is totally or partially immersed in oil that is heated above 180 degrees. In contact with hot frying oil, food loses water, absorbs oil, and exchanges lipids with the frying oil. Eating fried food in ad libitum conditions may result in the higher absolute intake of foods with high energy density and low satiety index. The relatively low satiety index of fats may be related to their low ability to stimulate insulin and leptin production." Leptin is a hormone in the body that indicates when the stomach is full.  

 

Refined Oils 

 

Refines oils like sunflower oils, mixed oil and soybean oil are high in Omega 6 fatty acids that may increase insulin resistance and leptin resistance. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition states that oils rich in Omega 3 fats like olive oil, canola oil and flaxseed oil are more resistant to oxidation but less resistant to insulin and leptin.










The best way to boost metabolism is to first make dietary changes by discarding foods that slow it down and including foods that boost it. Here are some ways you can boost your metabolism to lose weight effectively.  

 

>>> Fat-burning “Purple Weed” FIRES OFF 62 lbs of fat?


Monday, June 27, 2022

What is Anxiety and What To Know About It

 


Anxiety is a normal and often healthy emotion. However, when a person regularly feels disproportionate levels of anxiety, it might become a medical disorder.

 

Anxiety disorders form a category of mental health diagnoses that lead to excessive nervousness, fear, apprehension, and worry

These disorders alter how a person processes emotions and behave, also causing physical symptoms. Mild anxiety might be vague and unsettling, while severe anxiety may seriously affect day-to-day living.

Anxiety disorders affect 40 million people in the United States. It is the most common group of mental illnesses in the country. However, only 36.9 percent of people with an anxiety disorder receive treatment.

 

The anxiety disorder breakthrough- they’re curing it in weeks now

So what is anxiety?

The American Psychological Association (APA) defines anxiety as “an emotion characterized by feelings of tension, worried thoughts and physical changes like increased blood pressure.”

Knowing the difference between normal feelings of anxiety and an anxiety disorder requiring medical attention can help a person identify and treat the condition.

In this article, we look at the differences between anxiety and anxiety disorder, the different types of anxiety, and the available treatment options.

Anxiety

When an individual faces potentially harmful or worrying triggers, feelings of anxiety are not only normal but necessary for survival.

Since the earliest days of humanity, the approach of predators and incoming danger sets off alarms in the body and allows evasive action. These alarms become noticeable in the form of a raised heartbeat, sweating, and increased sensitivity to surroundings.

The danger causes a rush of adrenalin, a hormone and chemical messenger in the brain, which in turn triggers these anxious reactions in a process called the “fight-or-flight’ response. This prepares humans to physically confront or flee any potential threats to safety.

For many people, running from larger animals and imminent danger is a less pressing concern than it would have been for early humans. Anxieties now revolve around work, money, family life, health, and other crucial issues that demand a person’s attention without necessarily requiring the ‘fight-or-flight’ reaction.

The nervous feeling before an important life event or during a difficult situation is a natural echo of the original ‘fight-or-flight’ reaction. It can still be essential to survival – anxiety about being hit by a car when crossing the street, for example, means that a person will instinctively look both ways to avoid danger.

Anxiety disorders

The duration or severity of an anxious feeling can sometimes be out of proportion to the original trigger, or stressor. Physical symptoms, such as increased blood pressure and nausea, may also develop. These responses move beyond anxiety into an anxiety disorder.

The APA describes a person with anxiety disorder as “having recurring intrusive thoughts or concerns.” Once anxiety reaches the stage of a disorder, it can interfere with daily function.

 

The anxiety disorder breakthrough - they’re curing it in weeks now

Symptoms

While a number of different diagnoses constitute anxiety disorders, the symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) will often include the following:

  • restlessness, and a feeling of being “on-edge”
  • uncontrollable feelings of worry
  • increased irritability
  • concentration difficulties
  • sleep difficulties, such as problems in falling or staying asleep

While these symptoms might be normal to experience in daily life, people with GAD will experience them to persistent or extreme levels. GAD may present as vague, unsettling worry or a more severe anxiety that disrupts day-to-day living.

For information on the symptoms of other diagnoses under the umbrella of anxiety disorders, follow the links in the “Types” section below.

 Types

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders: Fifth Edition (DSM-V) classifies anxiety disorders into several main types.

In previous editions of DSM, anxiety disorders included obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as well as acute stress disorder. However, the manual now no longer groups Trusted Source these mental health difficulties under anxiety.

Anxiety disorders now include the following diagnoses.

Generalized anxiety disorder: This is a chronic disorder involving excessive, long-lasting anxiety and worries about nonspecific life events, objects, and situations. GAD is the most common anxiety disorder, and people with the disorder are not always able to identify the cause of their anxiety.

Panic disorder: Brief or sudden attacks of intense terror and apprehension characterize panic disorder. These attacks can lead to shaking, confusion, dizziness, nausea, and breathing difficulties. Panic attacks tend to occur and escalate rapidly, peaking after 10 minutes. However, a panic attack might last for hours.

Panic disorders usually occur after frightening experiences or prolonged stress but may also occur without a trigger. An individual experiencing a panic attack may misinterpret it as a life-threatening illness, and may make drastic changes in behavior to avoid future attacks.

Click here to learn more about panic disorder and panic attacks.

Specific phobia: This is an irrational fear and avoidance of a particular object or situation. Phobias are not like other anxiety disorders, as they relate to a specific cause.

A person with a phobia might acknowledge a fear as illogical or extreme but remain unable to control feelings anxiety around the trigger. Triggers for a phobia range from situations and animals to everyday objects.

Click here to learn more about phobias and how they develop.

Agoraphobia: This is a fear and avoidance of places, events, or situations from which it may be difficult to escape or in which help would not be available if a person becomes trapped. People often misunderstand this condition as a phobia of open spaces and the outdoors, but it is not so simple. A person with agoraphobia may have a fear of leaving home or using elevators and public transport.

Click here to learn about agoraphobia, an often-misunderstood psychological disorder.

Selective mutism: This is a form of anxiety that some children experience, in which they are not able to speak in certain places or contexts, such as school, even though they may have excellent verbal communication skills around familiar people. It may be an extreme form of social phobia.

 

The anxiety disorder breakthrough- they’re curing it in weeks now

 

Social anxiety disorder, or social phobia: This is a fear of negative judgment from others in social situations or of public embarrassment. Social anxiety disorder includes a range of feelings, such as stage fright, a fear of intimacy, and anxiety around humiliation and rejection.

This disorder can cause people to avoid public situations and human contact to the point that everyday living is rendered extremely difficult.

Separation anxiety disorder: High levels of anxiety after separation from a person or place that provides feelings of security or safety characterize separation anxiety disorder. Separation might sometimes result in panic symptoms.

 Treatment

Treatments will consist of a combination of psychotherapy, behavioral therapy, and medication.

Alcohol dependence, depression, or other conditions can sometimes have such a strong effect on mental well-being that treating an anxiety disorder must wait until any underlying conditions are brought under control.

Self-treatment

In some cases, a person can treat an anxiety disorder at home without clinical supervision. However, this may not be effective for severe or long-term anxiety disorders.

There are several exercises and actions to help a person cope with milder, more focused, or shorter-term anxiety disorders, including:

  • Stress management: Learning to manage stress can help limit potential triggers. Organize any upcoming pressures and deadlines, compile lists to make daunting tasks more manageable, and commit to taking time off from study or work.
  • Relaxation techniques: Simple activities can help soothe the mental and physical signs of anxiety. These techniques include meditation, deep breathing exercises, long baths, resting in the dark, and yoga.
  • Exercises to replace negative thoughts with positive ones: Make a list of the negative thoughts that might be cycling as a result of anxiety, and write down another list next to it containing positive, believable thoughts to replace them. Creating a mental image of successfully facing and conquering a specific fear can also provide benefits if anxiety symptoms relate to a specific cause, such as in a phobia.
  • Support network: Talk with familiar people who are supportive, such as a family member or friend. Support group services may also be available in the local area and online.
  • Exercise: Physical exertion can improve self-image and release chemicals in the brain that trigger positive feelings.

 

The end of anxiety - 16 years of suffering gone in weeks

Wednesday, June 8, 2022

What Is Glucose?

 


Glucose comes from the Greek word for "sweet." It's a type of sugar you get from foods you eat, and your body uses it for energy. As it travels through your bloodstream to your cells, it's called blood glucose or blood sugar.

Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose from your blood into the cells for energy and storage. People with diabetes have higher-than-normal levels of glucose in their blood. Either they don't have enough insulin to move it through or their cells don't respond to insulin as well as they should.

High blood glucose for a long period of time can damage your kidneyseyes, and other organs.

 

>> 30 Second “Bedtime Hack” Supports Healthy Glucose Levels & Shrinks Your Waistline While You Sleep

 

 

How Your Body Makes Glucose

It mainly comes from foods rich in carbohydrates, like bread, potatoes, and fruit. As you eat, food travels down your esophagus to your stomach. There, acids and enzymes break it down into tiny pieces. During that process, glucose is released.  It goes into your intestines where it's absorbed. From there, it passes into your bloodstream. Once in the blood, insulin helps glucose get to your cells.

 

Energy and Storage

Your body is designed to keep the level of glucose in your blood constant. Beta cells in your pancreas monitor your blood sugar level every few seconds. When your blood glucose rises after you eat, the beta cells release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin acts like a key, unlocking muscle, fat, and liver cells so glucose can get inside them.

Most of the cells in your body use glucose along with amino acids (the building blocks of protein) and fats for energy. But it's the main source of fuel for your brain. Nerve cells and chemical messengers there need it to help them process information. Without it, your brain wouldn't be able to work well.

After your body has used the energy it needs, the leftover glucose is stored in little bundles called glycogen in the liver and muscles. Your body can store enough to fuel you for about a day.

After you haven't eaten for a few hours, your blood glucose level drops. Your pancreas stops churning out insulin. Alpha cells in the pancreas begin to produce a different hormone called glucagon. It signals the liver to break down stored glycogen and turn it back into glucose.

That travels to your bloodstream to replenish your supply until you're able to eat again. Your liver can also make its own glucose using a combination of waste products, amino acids, and fats.

 

>> 30 Second “Bedtime Hack” Supports Healthy Glucose Levels & Shrinks Your Waistline While You Sleep

 

Blood Glucose Levels and Diabetes

Your blood sugar level normally rises after you eat. Then it dips a few hours later as insulin moves glucose into your cells. Between meals, your blood sugar should be less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl). This is called your fasting blood sugar level.

There are two types of diabetes:

  • In type 1 diabetes, your body doesn't have enough insulin. The immune system attacks and destroys cells of the pancreas, where insulin is made.
  • In type 2 diabetes, the cells don't respond to insulin like they should. So the pancreas needs to make more and more insulin to move glucose into the cells. Eventually, the pancreas is damaged and can't make enough insulin to meet the body's needs.

Without enough insulin, glucose can't move into the cells. The blood glucose level stays high. A level over 200 mg/dl 2 hours after a meal or over 125 mg/dl fasting is high blood glucose, called hyperglycemia.

Too much glucose in your bloodstream for a long period of time can damage the vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood to your organs. High blood sugar can increase your risk for:

People with diabetes need to test their blood sugar often. Exercise, diet, and medicine can help keep blood glucose in a healthy range and prevent these complications.

By Stephanie Watson

 

>> 30 Second “Bedtime Hack” Supports Healthy Glucose Levels & Shrinks Your Waistline While You Sleep

 

Monday, May 30, 2022

5 Ways to Manage Arthritis

 



There are a lot of things you can do to manage your arthritis. The day-to-day things you choose to do to manage your condition and stay healthy are “self-management” strategies and activities. CDC’s Arthritis Program recognizes five self-management strategies for managing arthritis and its symptoms.

Practice these simple strategies to reduce symptoms and get relief so you can pursue the activities that are important to you. These strategies can even help you manage other chronic conditions you have.


1.Learn new self-management skills

Join a self-management education workshop, which can help you learn the skills to manage your arthritis and make good decisions about your health.

How can a self-management education workshop help me?

Learning strategies to better manage your arthritis can help you:

  • Feel more in control of your health.
  • Manage pain and other symptoms.
  • Carry out daily activities, like going to work and spending time with loved ones.
  • Reduce stress.
  • Improve your mood.
  • Communicate better with your health care provider(s) about your care.

 

Healing Arthritis in 3 simple steps(for good)


2.Be Active

Physical activity is a simple and effective, non-drug way to relieve arthritis pain. Being physically active can reduce pain, improve function, mood, and quality of life for adults with arthritis. Regular physical activity can also reduce your risk of developing other chronic diseases, such as heart disease and diabetes. It can help you manage these conditions if you already have them.

Stay as active as your health allows, and change your activity level depending on your arthritis symptoms. Some physical activity is better than none.

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults be physically active at a moderate intensity for 150 minutes per week. Visit the health.gov website to learn more about the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americansexternal icon.

Unsure about what kind of activity is safe?

Get more information about how to exercise safely with arthritis or find a community program near you. Physical activity community programs—like Enhanced®Fitness, Walk With Ease, and others—help adults with arthritis be healthier and reduce arthritis symptoms.

 

3.Talk to your doctor

Talk to your doctor if you have joint pain and other arthritis symptoms. It’s important to get an accurate diagnosis as soon as possible so you can start treatment and work to minimize symptoms and prevent the disease from getting worse.

The focus of arthritis treatment is to

  • Reduce pain.
  • Minimize joint damage.
  • Improve or maintain function and quality of life

You can play an active role in controlling your arthritis by attending regular appointments with your health care provider and following your recommended treatment plan. This is especially important if you also have other chronic conditions, like diabetes or heart disease.


4.Manage your weight

Losing excess weight and staying at a healthy weight is particularly important for people with arthritis. For people who are overweight or obese, losing weight reduces stress on joints, particularly weight bearing joints like the hips and knees. In fact, losing as little as 10 to 12 pounds can improve pain and function for people with arthritis. At any age, low-impact, arthritis-friendly physical activity (like walking) and dietary changes can help you lose weight.

 

Healing Arthritis in 3 simple steps(for good)

 

5.Protect your joints

Joint injuries can cause or worsen arthritis. Choose activities that are easy on the joints like walking, bicycling, and swimming. These low-impact activities have a low risk of injury and do not twist or put too much stress on the joints. Learn more about how to exercise safely with arthritis.

Sports- or work-related injuries to joints can increase the likelihood of developing osteoarthritis. To reduce the likelihood of developing or worsening osteoarthritis, take steps to minimize or prevent injuries to joints, such as wearing protective equipment and avoiding repetitive motion joint damage.

 

Treating and Managing Arthritis

1. How is arthritis treated?

The focus of arthritis treatment is to:

  • Control pain.
  • Minimize joint damage.
  • Improve or maintain physical function and quality of life.

 

In inflammatory types of arthritis, it is also important to control inflammation. According to the American College of Rheumatology, arthritis treatment can include medications, nondrug therapies such as physical therapy or patient education, and sometimes surgery.  Managing your arthritis symptoms is very important as well.

2.What can you do to manage your arthritis?

Properly managing your arthritis can help you:

  • Decrease pain.
  • Improve function.
  • Stay productive.
  • Lower health care costs.

                                                                                                                                                        

Self-management is what you do day-to-day to manage your condition and stay healthy. Practice proven self-management strategies to reduce arthritis pain so you can pursue the activities that are important to you.

Tips for managing your pain during and after exercise

  • Until your pain improves, modify your physical activity program by exercising less frequently (days per week), for shorter periods of time (amount of time each session), or with less intensity.
  • Try a different type of exercise to reduce pressure on your joints—for example, switch from walking to water aerobics.
  • Do proper warm-up and cool-down before and after exercise.
  • Exercise at a comfortable pace—you should be able to carry on a conversation while exercising.
  • Make sure you have good fitting, comfortable shoes.

 

Healing Arthritis in 3 simple steps(for good)






Foods That Can Slow Down Your Metabolism

  Weight Loss:  If you have done your research on weight loss, you must have come across the word 'metabolism'. It is a biochemical ...